Monday, February 23, 2015

Page 989 -- CXII.

I know plenty about him,’ said Shenado. ‘Like the fact that he isn’t real, for instance.

What else?’ asked Marcos.

The reaper’s beak twisted impossibly into a frown, and her burning eyes flared up a little. ‘Why the sudden interest?

I was just thinking that it might be good to learn about religion from someone who isn’t also trying to make me believe it.

Shenado blinked at him. ‘You want a more objective teacher.

Well, I don’t know if I’d call you “objective,” but--

Ha, fine, alright. I suppose you have a point. When Axiolis inevitably brings it up, I shall make sure that I sit in on all of your lessons.

...Will he be okay with that?

Probably not.


Chapter One Hundred Twelve: ‘The house of four flames...’
Click to display entire chapter at once -- (mobile link)

As they continued north, Hector was surprised to find the vast stretch of barren and cracked flatlands gradually give rise to fields of grass and even the occasional tree. Considering that they were going to a place called Dunehall, he hadn’t been expecting to see much other than sand.

When they finally reached Moaban, it was the dead of night, but even through the darkness, Hector could see that the city wasn’t struggling for water. Rows of trees with arching canopies covered many of the roads, blocking out the night sky’s vibrant half-moon. The foliage was so thick that the first few areas they drove through made it feel like they’d suddenly entered a forest. After a time, however, there came a break in the trees, revealing an array of buildings buried in sand.

The change was so stark that it took Hector a while to understand what he was looking at.

Mountains of sand in the moonlight. In the middle of an otherwise lush, sand-free city. Hector could see four bulbous towers just barely peeking out from the centermost mound, each one topped off with a jagged spike pointed skyward.

As they pulled closer, the fortress before them became more obvious. Tall lamps illuminated the path into its heart, making the sand all around them glisten like still water. A tunnel guided their entourage up to an underground entrance, where the limousines finally eased to a stop. Everyone began exiting.

Hector marveled at the fine stonework around him. There seemed to be some wooden beams thrown in, along with some metal ones, but the whole area had a golden aura about it thanks to the lighting.

13 comments:

  1. ‘Well, I don’t *know* if I’d call you “objective,” but--’

    ReplyDelete
  2. It sounds so dang pretty @_@

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ask some devons art people to do some artwork for this whole novel!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Is it me, or is Hector turning into an architecture geek? Metallurgy: side effects may include random drooling over engineering of many kinds. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Is it just me or does anyone else get the feeling this is kind of anticlimactic? I had expected at least a couple of attacks from the Vanguard before they actually arrive. Then again, the absence of attacks makes me think that the Vanguard (or at least Parson) wanted them to go there.

    ReplyDelete
  6. So like real marriage is what you're saying. I don't see the problem here.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wut?? I catched up the latest chap already?? Damn... This is so addicting!!!
    Thankyou so much for providing us this wonderful story, Mr. Frost!
    I bought your books.. and I guess i stop reading this for awhile and wait for the next book on juli and read the entire Arc later.
    see you next time :)))))

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well, that's where soul-empowered airtight cages come in handy. I'm guessing that keeping enemy servants prisoner was just a side benefit of something intended to keep spirit voyeurs out of one's bedroom.
    On your first subject, nobody in the (legit or traitor) vanguard knows that the siege of Marshrock ended in a cease to hostility. Parson probably still thinks that the Blackburns are fighting everyone else who didn't show for the big fight with Sanko and Parson.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Let me guess; the that's all created sand. Having the entire battlefield already be on your side before the battle even begins makes for a strong home-field advantage. I'd go so far as to say the entire city is probably sitting on top of more of the stuff.

    Does leave the question of why the Rainlords didn't have a couple cisterns with a few million gallons of created water lying around, though.

    ReplyDelete
  10. That's a good point. The sand could definitely be used this way. Maybe if you destroyed only a fraction of the sand, it would create a quicksand-like effect.

    ReplyDelete
  11. ... He is just your ordinary metal structures geek...

    ReplyDelete